Malt Extract | All Grain | Extract/Grain

 

Intermediate - Extract/Grain Recipes

These recipes are pretty much arranged from lightest to darkest. Besides the usual brewing equipment you will need a large stock pot (15L or more recommended), and a collander or spagetti strainer.
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Honey Pale Ale O.G. - 1.050 .................. $22.50
7 lb pale malt extract
1 lb or so honey
8 oz honey malt
4 oz carapils malt
1 oz Willamette: 75% boil, 25% finish
1 oz Cascade: 75% boil, 25% finish
ale yeast
Prime with 2/3 cup of honey (Honey, being 100% fermentable, tends to dry the beer out rather than sweeten it.)
This ale uses the classic Shaftebury hop blend-Cascade/Willamette, 75% boil, 25% finish - for a well rounded, but not overpowering hop character. Stir the honey into your kettle after you have finished boiling - boiling the honey will drive off most of its flavour and aroma, leaving you with pretty much pure invert sugar. The type of honey you use isn't critical because a lot of its subtleties will be carried off with the CO2 during fermentation. If you have some really nice aromatic honey, save it for priming.

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Traditional Ale Recipe O.G. - 1.046 .................... $23.50
7.25 lb pale malt extract
4 oz carapils malt
4 oz carastan malt
9 AAU bittering hop (60 minutes)
1 oz cascade/willamette (finishing hops)
1 oz cascade/willamette (dry hops)
Ale yeast
This is a light, crisp English Bitter, with a huge, full spectrum hop flavour and aroma. Originally based on Shaftebury Traditional Ale (Vancouver hop lovers' favourite circa 1990), this recipe has evolved slowly over the years with the addition of dry hopping and slightly increased bitterness.

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Bo's Best Bitter O.G. 1.046 ........................ $23.88
7.25 lb pale malt extract
4 oz Carapils malt
8 oz Crystal malt
6.4 AAU bittering hop (60 minutes)
1 oz Mt. Hood mid-boil hop (30 minutes)
1 oz Mt. Hood finishing hop
Ale Yeast
Bo Green is a singer/songwriter/homebrewer who knows how to make a damned fine English Best Bitter. As a style, Best Bitter falls in the middle of the Pale Ale category, slightly darker and hoppier than Ordinary Bitter. This recipe favours hop character, both the hop choice and the mid-boil addition are a bit of a departure from classic British tradition.

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Grapefruit Bitter O.G. - 1.050 .................... $25.45
8lb pale malt extract
12 oz carastan malt
4 oz wheat malt
9 AAU Centennial bittering hops (60 minutes)
1.5 oz Centennial finishing hops
ale yeast
A Pacific North-West style English bitter. Centennial hops give this beer a citrusy - grapefruit flavour. I recommend using whole hops for the full effect.

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O.K. Spring Pale Ale O.G. - 1.050 .................... $22.50
8lb pale malt extract
8 oz honey malt
9 AAU Northern Brewer 60 minutes
ale yeast
This is the malt extract version of Okanagan Spring's Pale Ale. The Brewery uses 60% pale malt and 40% munich malt, both of which require mashing. Honey malt lends the same "toasty" flavour and aroma as the munich, but more intense, therefore less is required.

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Strathcona Pale Ale O.G. - 1.048 .................... $23.50\
8lb pale malt extract
4 oz wheat malt 8 oz British crystal malt
9.4 AAU Cascade/Goldings (60/40) 60 minutes
1 oz Goldings/Cascade (66/33) finishing
ale yeast
This is my personal favourite Pale Ale recipe. The Bittering is right down the middle at 30 I.B.U.'s. The subtle grassiness of the classic English Goldings is accentuated by the citrussy high notes of modern Cascade hops.

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Hurrricane India Pale Ale O.G. - 1.065 .................... $29.67
10 lb Pale Malt Extract
18 AAU Centennial or columbus bittering hops
1 oz Willamette finishing hops
.5 oz Centennial or Cascade finishing hops
1 oz Willamette Dry hops
Ale Yeast
This recipe is, of course, an extract version of the commercial beer. Storm Brewing uses Gambrinus 2-row pale malt, for which I've substituted pale malt syrup. The original gravity of the commercial beer actually varies from 1.057 and 1.070 depending on the time of year, what kind of mood James is in, not to mention what kind of day the beer gods are having. The whole flower hops that I sell are from the same bales that Storm uses, and I usually have yeast from the brewery available.

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India Pale Ale O.G. 1.056 ....................$27.85
8.5 lb Pale Malt Extract
10 oz Carastan malt
15 AAU - Centennial bittering hops
.75 oz Willamette finishing hops
.75 oz Centennial or Cascade finishing hops
1 oz Willamette/centennial or Cascade dry hops
Ale Yeast
Compared to Storm's Hurricane, this is a tamer, more traditional English I.P.A., though I've still opted for the more aggressive Pacific North-West hops. For a more authentic English I.P.A., use East Kent Goldings, Brambling Cross, or Challenger and add a heaping teaspoon of gypsum.

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Irish Red Ale - O.G. - 1.055 .................... $27.45
8.5 lb pale extract
5 oz crystal malt
4 oz wheat malt
8 oz carapils* malt
1 oz Roast Barley
2 oz Mt hood: 75% boil, 25% Finish
1 oz Cascade: 75% boil, 25% Finish
Ale Yeast
for mash or partial mash, use barley flakes
A creamy, malty red ale, nicely balanced but not overpowered by a refreshing hop snap.

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Storm Highlander Scottish Ale - O.G. 1.050 .................... $24.00
8lb Pale Malt Extract
6 AAU - Willamette (boil 60 minutes)
9 oz honey malt
8 oz carapils*
2 oz roast barley
2 oz peated malt
Ale Yeast
This is Storm Brewing's Scottish Ale recipe, formulated by Scottish punk rocker David Macanulty. The original is fermented at a cool, cellerish temperature, about 18 degrees. For All-grain brewing, use barley flakes in place of carapils.

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Shaftebury Cream Ale - O.G. - 1.042 .................... $20.00
6lb 10 oz pale malt extract
4 oz carapils malt
5 oz British crystal malt
4 oz chocolate malt
1 oz willamette \1/2 oz cascade blend together and boil 75% for 1 hour / use 25% for finishing
ale yeast
This recipe is to the budding homebrewer what "Smoke On The Water" once was to a twelve year old picking up a guitar for the first time.

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Shirley's Nutbrown Ale - O.G. - 1.050 ....................$25.00
8 lb pale malt extract
8 oz British crystal malt
8 oz chocolate malt
2 oz roast barley
8 oz wheat
6.3 AAU Goldings
.4 oz Goldings (finishing)
ale yeast
Shirley Warne originally brewed this beer in the late 1980's at the Amsterdam Brewpub in Toronto. She later brought the recipe with her to the Steamworks Brewpub here in Vancouver. This is a full bodied, chewy, complex ale, conservatively hopped in order to let the malt flavours come through. *Highly recommended*.

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Strathcona Porter II - O.G. - 1.060 .................... $29.30
10 lb pale malt extract
9 oz British crystal
12 oz Black Patent
14 AAU bittering hop (60 minutes)
ale yeast
This might be called Extra Special Strathcona Porter. This is a strong porter, but in the same balance as a traditional porter, as opposed to, say, Okanagan Spring Olde English Porter where balance is thrown out the window in favour of sweetness and alcohol content.

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Dry Irish Stout - O.G. 1.046 .................... $24.00
7lb 4oz Pale Malt Extract
8 oz Wheat Malt
8 oz Carapils Malt
1 lb Roast Barley
15 AAU bittering hop (Centennial, Columbus)
ale yeast
While not traditional stout ingredients, the wheat malt encourages a lacy white head and the carapils provides body and creaminess. To really achieve the body, head and creaminess of a stout, you need Barley Flakes, which must be mashed and therefore cannot be used in a malt extract recipe. (sorry)

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Espresso Ale - O.G. 1.046 .................... $23.60
7 lb 4 oz Dark Malt Extract
12 oz Crystal Malt
5 oz Black Patent Malt
8.4 AAU Willamette or Fuggles
1/2 oz Willamette or Fuggles (finishing)
1/2 lb ground Espresso beans
ale yeast
Credit for this recipe goes to Julie Stines, who came up with this in 1992, years before any commercial brewery even dreamed of using coffee in beer. Make the coffee separately and add to the primary or secondary.


 

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The Procedure:



1.  In a medium sized saucepan, heat 1.5 litres of water for each lb of grains to about 75 Celcius and turn off heat.(this is about 10 or 15 degrees hotter than your hot water tank) Add the crushed grains, cover and steep for 30 to 45 minutes.

 

2.  While that is steeping, fill your kettle about half full of water and bring it to a boil. Set the tub of malt extract in your sink with hot water to soften it up. When the water comes to a boil, move the kettle off the  burner and stir in the malt extract, making sure that none is stuck to the bottom. Rinse the container with hot water to get all the malt extract. Your kettle should now be about 3/4 full. Bring it to a boil, stirring occasionally, and watching it carefully to avoid a boil over.

 

3.  Yeast Starter (optional): Rehydrate dry yeast in warm water as per packet instructions. When your wort comes to a boil, scoop out about 1/2 cup and put it in a sanitised jar. Cool to 20 22 degrees by diluting with cold water, add yeast and cover loosely.  

NOTE: you can skip this step and just sprinkle the dry yeast on your cooled wort after topping up to 23 litres. If you are using Danstar (Nottingham, Windsor or Munich) I highly recommend this over their convoluted rehydration and "attemperation" instructions.                       

 

 

4.  When the grains have steeped for 30 minutes or more, strain through a colander, or spaghetti strainer into your kettle. You will notice that the grains have soaked up most of the water. "Sparge" the grains by pouring another litre or so of hot water through them, much like making drip coffee. You are done with the grains now; compost them, feed them to your budgie, but whatever you do, don't put them in your brew kettle.

 

5.  When your kettle comes back to a boil, toss in your boiling hops and continue to boil for 1 hour.

 

6.  At the end of the hour add the remaining hops and remove from heat. Precisely when you add the finishing hops is a matter of taste. More than two minutes of boiling will result in more hop flavour at the expense of aroma, adding them after removing from heat source will result in maximum aroma but less hop flavour. In any case, set your pot in a sink full of cold water to chill the wort while the hops steep.

 

   Change the water often        OR

   Set the kettle on a flat cloth over the unstopped drain and turn on the cold water. Move the kettle until the water is draining at the same rate that fresh, cold water is filling the sink. If the phone rings, don't answer it.

 

Cover the kettle, putting ice cubes on the lid, and let it cool for about 15 minutes (30 C or so). Topping up your fermentor with cold tap water should bring the pitching temperature to around 20 degrees.

 

7.  Pour the cooled wort through a strainer into your primary, top up to 23 litres with cold water, add the yeast and brew as usual.

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